“I don’t feel like I’m talented,” he admits. “But I work really hard.”

For him, it was hard work and his strong mindset which allowed him to see him a lot of success. He grew up in Eugene, Oregon (a town nicknamed Track Town, USA), and after playing games like football, baseball, and basketball, Hanes used running as a means to relate with his track-and-field-loving dad.

“My dad was superman in my eyes,” he says. “And running was always something that we shared in common.

After high school, Cameron Hanes became more dedicated to running, regarding it as deeper than just a hobby. As a grave backcountry bowhunter, he was not a newcomer or a debutant to hiking which involved more than 20 miles in one day, so increasing persistence is vital for a victorious hunt. “I started to see how my passion for bowhunting and endurance sports could marry up,” he says. “I told myself, ‘This is where I can improve my game.’

Thus, Cameron Hanes began by starting small and ran in local 5K and 10K marathons, and then slowly he worked his way up to more distances. After completing a number of long-distance marathons all around the country and also breathing Lance Armstrong in the 2008 Boston Marathon, he jumped from 26.2 distance to 50K, 50miler, 100K, 100 milers, and the popular Bigfoot 200 in 2016 where he grabbed the 8th spot. But for this, it was hard to train and get there.

Cameron Hanes Training Routine

Hanes’ training program involves a regimen he prefers to name “Run. Lift. Shoot.,” which, just like the name shows, involves a 5–20-mile run on a mountain near his house, a weightlifting session in the gym, and time used shooting his crossbow. Throughout the fall and winter periods, Hanes concentrates on increasing muscle to preserve his joints and stay sharp for hunting season, but spring and summer months need an extended mileage and a little less emphasis on time in the weight room because having less muscle when running about 200 miles creates a large disparity.

Nonetheless what season or time of the year it is, for Hanes, it is all about the challenges which he goes through with tough dedication and hard work which keeps him running, lifting, and shooting every single day. When asked about how he manages all of it without fail each day, he says,

“I just do it,” he says. “It’s not even up for discussion. I don’t have to make a decision on what I’m going to do that day, because I already know I’m going to do it. It’s just part of my routine.”